From August 2015

Wildflowers for lawns

Wildflowers for lawns
Self heal

Q: Is it possible to buy wildflowers for lawns ?

A: Most garden lawns  contain rye grass, a hard wearing species designed to cope with the wear and tear.  Unfortunately rye grass isn’t compatible with many wildflowers, so the best approach can often be to remove any existing grass and sow a wildflower and meadow grass mixture without rye grass.

If this is not possible however, there are still a few species of wildflowers that can be grown quite successfully in lawns containing rye grass. Read more

Wildflowers for fertile soils

Q: What wildflowers are likely to compete well and establish successfully on fertile soils?

A: The following species in our experience are all strong growing and compete well. We can supply all the species listed below as individual wildflower seeds and several as wildflower plant plugs

Yarrow
Common Sorrel
Black Knapweed Read more

Reason for low sowing rate of wildflower meadow seed mixes

Q: Why is such a low sowing rate of 4 grams per sq. metre recommended for wildflower meadow seed mixtures?

A: A low sowing rate is used to encourage a somewhat patchy open grass sward in the short term. This helps to create receptive conditions necessary for the development of wildflower seedlings. Eventually the sward will thicken and close up.

Wildflower meadow seed mixes and their use in field margins.

Q: How can I establish a Wild flower meadow seed mix in an arable field grass margin ?

A: On arable farmland, wildflower meadow seed is best established alongside hedges, ditches and water courses. The aim is to create a conservation headland several metres wide that will contain a mixture of Native British Wild flowers and Native Meadow grasses that will require minimal maintenance. Read more